Recent Posts

You Can Trust SERVPRO With Your Restoration Needs | SERVPRO® of West Topeka

5/25/2022 (Permalink)

Two SERVPRO employees unloading equipment You Can Trust SERVPRO With Your Restoration Needs | SERVPRO® of West Topeka

When you’re choosing a service provider to take care of issues in your home or commercial property, there’s nothing more valuable than the peace of mind that comes with selecting the right company to work with.

Whether you’re dealing with routine maintenance or you have large-scale water, fire or storm damage on your hands, you can be assured that SERVPRO of West Topeka will provide you with outstanding service. Here’s why:

We Can Tackle Any Water Damage


Whether it’s from a sudden flood or a hidden leak, discovering water damage anywhere in your home or business can be alarming. Sadly, property flooding is very common, and floods cause more than $10 billion in damages nationwide every year.

However, by staying calm and following a few steps right away, you can get your property on the road to recovery in no time. With our water damage experts, a 24⁄7 Emergency Service line and the ability to work with your insurance provider on your behalf, we can provide a solution tailored to your situation and get your life back to normal faster.

Fire Damage Doesn’t Stand a Chance


A fire department in the United States responds to a fire every 23 seconds, and there was roughly $8.1 billion in direct property damage and losses nationwide in 2020.

Damage caused by a fire is devastating for your family and your home. It’s a stressful and confusing time, so you’ll need a caring expert to guide you through this crisis. Our professionals will always treat you with respect and empathy, and we’ll always treat your home and belongings with great care.

If your home or business has sustained fire damage, we’ll jump right into action with our seven-step restoration process that includes an inspection and damage assessment before moving on to any repairs and construction.

Storm Damage


In Topeka and across the Great Plains, tornadoes are especially prevalent. Twisters can cause devastating and seemingly irreparable damage, but that’s where West Topeka’s team of restoration experts comes into play. Our goal is always to have you back in your newly restored home as soon as possible.

We are storm and water damage specialists who get started promptly to get your property dry and back to pre-storm condition. Using advanced equipment and scientific drying techniques, we document the drying process to validate your home or business is ready.

What Sets SERVPRO Apart?


We guarantee a quick response time. “Faster to any size disaster” is more than just a slogan to us. We know that the longer issues like mold, water and fire damage are allowed to fester, the more detrimental to your structure they can be.

Disasters don’t have respect for your schedule, but you can count on our 24⁄7 Emergency Service to be there whenever you call. Whether it’s a weekend, a holiday or the middle of the night, we’re at-the-ready to get your repairs started right away.

In addition, we always make an effort to keep up with the latest products and methods. As technologies change, best practices for cleaning and restoration do, too. You can count on our team to always put our best foot forward to help you out of a tough situation.

Covid Cleaning

5/22/2022 (Permalink)

covid cleaning Covid Cleaning

SERVPRO is Here to Help during this time of need:

During this unprecedented time caused by the global pandemic of COVID-19, this is a reminder to our customers that we are specialists in cleaning services, and we adhere to the highest cleaning and sanitation standards.

Specialized Training

We are prepared to clean and disinfect your home or business, according to protocols set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We have years of experience in dealing with biological contaminants, and we will go beyond the scope of work that regular janitorial staff perform on a daily basis.
The CDC encourages cleaning of high-touch surfaces such as counters, tabletops, doorknobs, light switches, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets and tables. Other spaces mentioned in the CDC’s guidance for commercial spaces include:
• Kitchen/Food Areas
• Bathrooms
• Schools/Classrooms
• Offices
• Retail Spaces
• Water Fountains
• Shelving/Racks
• Sales Counters
• Carpets and Rugs
• Stair Handrails
• Elevator Cars
• Playground Equipment
• Fitness Equipment

Specialized Products

The CDC recommends usage of a labeled hospital-grade disinfectant with claims against similar pathogens to COVID-19.
Multiple products in the SERVPRO product line carry the EPA-approved emerging pathogens claims. While there is currently no product tested against this particular strain of COVID-19, we are following all guidelines as provided by the CDC and local
authorities.


Call Today for a Proactive Cleaning: 785-862-0550
If your home or business needs deep cleaning services, call the experts today –
SERVPRO of West Topeka

Smoke odors....real or imaginary

5/13/2022 (Permalink)

smoke odors real or imaginary smoke odors.....real or imaginary?

SERVPRO of West Topeka knows that when your business or residence has a fire there are an overwhelming amount of tasks to deal with. From the beginning of cleaning to the final put back, there are a lot of decisions to make and sometimes not a lot of time to make them in. That is why we staff highly trained technicians, experienced in cleaning smoke and soot damage on any number of items. However, even after a thorough cleaning, odors can seem to linger. Sometimes these odors are real and sometimes they are imagined.

Did you know there are two odor types? We classify them as Real and Imagined.

1. Real odor is the sensation of smell caused by a real substance.
2. Imaginary odor is what people think they smell.

However, no matter what kind of odor you are experiencing SERVPRO is always here to help and answer any questions you might have!

Secondary damage from a water loss

5/11/2022 (Permalink)

secondary damage from a water loss secondary damage from a water loss

Sometimes in the process of cleaning up a water damage, or really any kind of damage that SERVPRO of West Topeka handles: fire, storm, general cleaning, etc, we find secondary damage from any number of sources. Sometimes it is mold damage from if the water loss was left untreated for too long. However in this case it is damage from a termite infestation. This is a rarer find than mold or asbestos but it does still happen. For some tips on how to prevent a termite infestation in your home please see the below information:

Keep all shrubbery near your home trimmed, allowing at least a 12 inch space between the plants and the exterior wall of your home. This will create an air flow and allow damp areas to dry out quicker.
Use pine needles instead of mulch. Pine needles are less appealing to termites.
Keep all sprinkler heads pointed away from your home’s foundation. Termites like moisture and a sprinkler pointing toward your home creates an ideal environment for them.

In Case of Emergency

5/9/2022 (Permalink)

In case of emergency In case of Emergency

This page explains what actions to take when you receive a tornado watch or warning alert from the National Weather Service for your local area and what to do before, during, and after a tornado.

Know your risk

What

A tornado is a violently rotating column of air that extends from a thunderstorm to the ground and is often—although not always—visible as a funnel cloud. Lightning and hail are common in thunderstorms that produce tornadoes. Tornadoes cause extensive damage to structures and disrupt transportation, power, water, gas, communications, and other services in its direct path and in neighboring areas. Related thunderstorms can cause heavy rains, flash flooding, and hail

Where

About 1,200 tornadoes hit the United States every year and every state is at risk. Most tornadoes in the United States occur east of the Rocky Mountains with concentrations in the central and southern plains, the Gulf Coast and Florida.

When

Tornadoes can strike in any season, but occur most often in the spring and summer months. They can occur at all hours of the day and night, but are most likely to occur between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m.

Before a Tornado

Identify safe rooms built to FEMA criteria or ICC500 storm shelters or other potential protective locations in sturdy buildings near your home, work, and other locations you frequent so you have a plan for where you will go quickly for safety when there is a Warning or an approaching tornado.
For schools, malls, and other buildings with long-span roofs or open space plans, or many occupants, ask the building manager to identify the best available refuge.
Build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or television newscasts for the latest information. In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.
Be alert to changing weather conditions. Look for approaching storms.
Look for the following danger signs:
Dark, often greenish sky
Large hail
A large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating)
Loud roar, similar to a freight train.
If you see approaching storms or any of the danger signs, be prepared to take shelter immediately.


Tornado Facts

The extent of destruction caused by tornadoes depends on the tornado’s intensity, size, path, time of day, and amount of time it is on the ground. Wind from tornadoes can reach more than 300 miles per hour, and damage paths can be more than 1 mile wide and 50 miles long. Wind from tornadoes can destroy buildings and trees, transform debris into deadly projectiles, and roll vehicles.

They may strike quickly, with little or no warning.
They may appear nearly transparent until dust and debris are picked up or a cloud forms in the funnel.
The average tornado moves Southwest to Northeast, but tornadoes have been known to move in any direction.
Tornadoes can accompany tropical storms and hurricanes as they move onto land.
Waterspouts are tornadoes that form over water.
Know the Terms

Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a tornado hazard:

Tornado Watch - Tornadoes are possible. When there is a Watch, move to be near enough to a shelter or sturdy building to be able to get there quickly in a few minutes if there is a Warning or if you see signs of a tornado approaching. Remain alert for approaching storms. Watch the sky and stay tuned to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio or television for information.
Tornado Warning - A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. Take shelter immediately.


During a Tornado

If you are under a tornado warning, seek shelter immediately! Most injuries associated with high winds are from flying debris, so remember to protect your head.

If you are in school, nursing home, hospital, factory, shopping center, high-rise building pre-identified best available refuge then:

Go to a pre-designated area such as a safe room built to FEMA criteria, or a small interior windowless room on the lowest level, below ground in a basement, or storm cellar, is best. (Closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors, and outside walls. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside. Get under a sturdy table and cover your head and neck with your arms and cover your body as best you can e.g., with a heavy coat or blankets, pillows. .
In a high-rise building, go to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.
Do not open windows.
A sturdy structure (e.g. residence, small building) , school, nursing home, hospital, factory, shopping center, high-rise building)
A manufactured home or office then:

Get out immediately and go to a pre-identified location such as the lowest floor of a sturdy, nearby building or a storm shelter. Mobile homes, even if tied down, do not offer protection from tornadoes.

The outside with no shelter then:

If you are not in a sturdy building, there is no single research-based recommendation for what last-resort action to take because many factors can affect your decision. Possible actions include:
Immediately get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest sturdy shelter. If your vehicle is hit by flying debris while you are driving, pull over and park.
Take cover in a stationary vehicle. Put the seat belt on and cover your head with your arms and a blanket, coat or other cushion if possible.
In all situations:
Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low, flat location.
Never try to outrun a tornado in urban or congested areas in a car or truck. Instead, leave the vehicle immediately for protection in a sturdy building. .
Outdoor areas are not protected from flying debris. Flying debris from tornadoes causes most fatalities and injuries.
After a Tornado

If you are trapped, do not move about or kick up dust. Tap on a pipe or wall or use a whistle, if you have one, so that rescuers can locate you.
Listen to local officials for updates and instructions.
Check-in with family and friends by texting or using social media.
Watch out for debris and downed power lines.
Stay out of damaged buildings and homes until local authorities indicate it is safe.
Use extreme caution during post-disaster clean-up of buildings and around debris. Do not attempt to remove heavy debris by yourself. Wear protective clothing, including a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, work gloves, and sturdy, thick-soled shoes during clean-up.
Photograph the damage to your property in order to assist in filing an insurance claim.
Do what you can to prevent further damage to your property, (e.g., putting a tarp on a damaged roof), as insurance may not cover additional damage that occurs after the storm.
If your home is without power, use flashlights or battery-powered lanterns rather than candles to prevent accidental fires.
Kansas weather can be unpredictable! Be informed & stay safe!

If tragedy strikes remember, SERVPRO of West Topeka is always here to help!

785-862-0550

Tornadoes......Are you prepared?

5/9/2022 (Permalink)

Tornadoes Tornadoes are you prepared

This page explains what actions to take when you receive a tornado watch or warning alert from the National Weather Service for your local area and what to do before, during, and after a tornado.

Know your risk

What

A tornado is a violently rotating column of air that extends from a thunderstorm to the ground and is often—although not always—visible as a funnel cloud. Lightning and hail are common in thunderstorms that produce tornadoes. Tornadoes cause extensive damage to structures and disrupt transportation, power, water, gas, communications, and other services in its direct path and in neighboring areas. Related thunderstorms can cause heavy rains, flash flooding, and hail

Where

About 1,200 tornadoes hit the United States every year and every state is at risk. Most tornadoes in the United States occur east of the Rocky Mountains with concentrations in the central and southern plains, the Gulf Coast and Florida.

When

Tornadoes can strike in any season, but occur most often in the spring and summer months. They can occur at all hours of the day and night, but are most likely to occur between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m.

Before a Tornado

  • Identify safe rooms built to FEMA criteria or ICC500 storm shelters or other potential protective locations in sturdy buildings near your home, work, and other locations you frequent so you have a plan for where you will go quickly for safety when there is a Warning or an approaching tornado.
  • For schools, malls, and other buildings with long-span roofs or open space plans, or many occupants, ask the building manager to identify the best available refuge.
  • Build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or television newscasts for the latest information. In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.
  • Be alert to changing weather conditions. Look for approaching storms.
  • Look for the following danger signs:
  • Dark, often greenish sky
    • Large hail
    • A large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating)
    • Loud roar, similar to a freight train.
  • If you see approaching storms or any of the danger signs, be prepared to take shelter immediately.

Tornado Facts

The extent of destruction caused by tornadoes depends on the tornado’s intensity, size, path, time of day, and amount of time it is on the ground. Wind from tornadoes can reach more than 300 miles per hour, and damage paths can be more than 1 mile wide and 50 miles long. Wind from tornadoes can destroy buildings and trees, transform debris into deadly projectiles, and roll vehicles.

  • They may strike quickly, with little or no warning.
  • They may appear nearly transparent until dust and debris are picked up or a cloud forms in the funnel.
  • The average tornado moves Southwest to Northeast, but tornadoes have been known to move in any direction.
  • Tornadoes can accompany tropical storms and hurricanes as they move onto land.
  • Waterspouts are tornadoes that form over water.

Know the Terms

Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a tornado hazard:

  • Tornado Watch - Tornadoes are possible. When there is a Watch, move to be near enough to a shelter or sturdy building to be able to get there quickly in a few minutes if there is a Warning or if you see signs of a tornado approaching. Remain alert for approaching storms. Watch the sky and stay tuned to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio or television for information.
  • Tornado Warning - A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. Take shelter immediately.

During a Tornado

If you are under a tornado warning, seek shelter immediately!  Most injuries associated with high winds are from flying debris, so remember to protect your head.

If you are in school, nursing home, hospital, factory, shopping center, high-rise building pre-identified best available refuge then:       

  • Go to a pre-designated area such as a safe room built to FEMA criteria, or a small interior windowless room on the lowest level, below ground in a basement, or storm cellar, is best. (Closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors, and outside walls. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside. Get under a sturdy table and cover your head and neck with your arms and cover your body as best you can e.g., with a heavy coat or blankets, pillows. .
  • In a high-rise building, go to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.
  • Do not open windows.
  • A sturdy structure (e.g. residence, small building) , school, nursing home, hospital, factory, shopping center, high-rise building)

A manufactured home or office then:            

 Get out immediately and go to a pre-identified location such as the lowest floor of a sturdy, nearby building or a storm shelter. Mobile homes, even if tied down, do not offer protection from tornadoes.

The outside with no shelter then:

  • If you are not in a sturdy building, there is no single research-based recommendation for what last-resort action to take because many factors can affect your decision. Possible actions include:
  • Immediately get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest sturdy shelter. If your vehicle is hit by flying debris while you are driving, pull over and park.
  • Take cover in a stationary vehicle. Put the seat belt on and cover your head with your arms and a blanket, coat or other cushion if possible.
  • In all situations:
  • Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low, flat location.
  • Never try to outrun a tornado in urban or congested areas in a car or truck. Instead, leave the vehicle immediately for protection in a sturdy building. .
  • Outdoor areas are not protected from flying debris. Flying debris from tornadoes causes most fatalities and injuries.

After a Tornado

  • If you are trapped, do not move about or kick up dust. Tap on a pipe or wall or use a whistle, if you have one, so that rescuers can locate you.
  • Listen to local officials for updates and instructions.
  • Check-in with family and friends by texting or using social media.
  • Watch out for debris and downed power lines.
  • Stay out of damaged buildings and homes until local authorities indicate it is safe.
  • Use extreme caution during post-disaster clean-up of buildings and around debris. Do not attempt to remove heavy debris by yourself. Wear protective clothing, including a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, work gloves, and sturdy, thick-soled shoes during clean-up.
  • Photograph the damage to your property in order to assist in filing an insurance claim.
  • Do what you can to prevent further damage to your property, (e.g., putting a tarp on a damaged roof), as insurance may not cover additional damage that occurs after the storm.
  • If your home is without power, use flashlights or battery-powered lanterns rather than candles to prevent accidental fires.

Kansas weather can be unpredictable! Be informed & stay safe!

If tragedy strikes remember, SERVPRO of W. Topeka is always here to help!

785-862-0550

How to Sanitize Surfaces

5/8/2022 (Permalink)

How to Sanitize Surfaces How to Sanitize Surfaces

In these uncertain times, SERVPRO of West Topeka knows staying safe and staying inside are two of the most important things you can do. However, if you have to go out for work, to get groceries, or you just need to get out of your house and take a walk, it is important to make sure you are washing your hands and keeping clean surfaces at home. There is a lot of misinformation out there and it can be hard to know the correct method for disinfecting surfaces. You've heard of these cleaning types before, but do you know the differences between them?

General Surface Cleaning

Physically removes microbes if possible, rather than killing them with a sanitizer or disinfectant. 

Sanitizing

To be a registered sanitizer, test results must show a reduction of at least 99.9% in bacteria.

Disinfecting

Destroys or irreversibly inactivates microbes, but not necessarily the spores of bacteria and fungi.

If someone in your home or work area does test positive for COVID-19, or if you want preventative sanitizing done, SERVPRO of West Topeka has all the correct equipment to get it done for you. Just call us at 785-862-0550.

Odor Removal

5/7/2022 (Permalink)

A giant nose smelling the air Odor Removal

SERVPRO of West Topeka knows that sometimes odors happen and there can be any number of causes. Whether it be a rogue mouse that died in a wall, nicotine residue from years of cigarette smoke buildup, or a pile of your kids soccer jerseys that you forgot about in the trunk of your car.

SERVPRO is prepared to deal with any and all of these issues. The science of identifying and eliminating odors can be tricky, but as pros in deodorization, we're able to take care of it. Whether it’s a smoky smell in a vehicle, or a locker room full of stinky equipment, we’ve got odor solutions for any size job.

So if you have any questions about how SERVPRO can help out with odors in your residential or commercial property or in your car, just give us a call at 785-862-0550!

Commercial Building Clean Up

5/3/2022 (Permalink)

Nave of a church Commercial Building Clean Up

SERVPRO of West Topeka knows that water, mold, and fire damage can happen in any commercial property just as easily as any residential property. That is why we are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to answer your call. SERVPRO employs highly trained technicians who are ready to work on any kind of loss, big or small. We have experience with many different types of commercial buildings from cleaning facilities to industrial park buildings to churches. In the photo for this blog you will see one of the many churches we have worked on. This particular building had extensive water damage from a roof leak. We were able to mitigate the damage and return all the affected parts of the building back to preloss conditions.

Smoke Damage vs. Soot Damage

4/30/2022 (Permalink)

Two SERVPRO employees cleaning soot off walls Smoke Damage vs. Soot Damage

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.

Smoke and soot facts:

Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.


Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of West Topeka will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.
Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.
Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor.
Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions. We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage. We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage? Call Us Today – 785-862-0550